mortonfox: (xmas)
New Year's Eve and New Year's Day fall on the weekend this time but I had Friday off too. Friday's trip was to Lancaster County since I hadn't been there in a while. Tried to get a few more geocaches on the Manheim and Mount Joy side of the county since I'd skipped those on previous trips. The most interesting location was the circle of rocks, like a small Stonehenge, in Manheim.

Saturday's trip was first to Morgantown, to finish the "Morgantown Overlook" multi-cache. I got the first 3 stages last weekend but I could not complete it then because it got dark. After that, I hit the Reading, Leesport, and Lenhartsville areas with a stop in the oddly-named Virginville. For the day, there were some unusual caches and a mysterious stone artifact.

And finally, Sunday's outing was to Hammonton, Egg Harbor City, Laureldale, and Mays Landing in South Jersey. I hadn't been to that area in quite a long time so there were lots of new caches. The view of Lake Lenape in Mays Landing was pretty clear on a winter's day.

The caches... )
mortonfox: (chicken fries)
Saturday was the day I tackled the group of 10 geocaches in Birch Run Preserve in the Coatesville area. The first cache nearest the parking area was "Barkley's First Shed", a Wherigo. I figured the Wherigo cartridge would take me pretty much all over the park, so I kept that running while I found the other caches along the way. Incidentally, "shed" here refers to a cast off deer antler, not a small storage structure. Barkley is a dog so until I got partway through the cartridge and saw that the shed was a deer antler, I was wondering what he wanted with a wooden hut! Anyway, doing both the regular geocaches and the Wherigo at the same time worked beautifully, even if I had to make two big detours for geocaches that were somewhat off from the main trail. All in all, the whole hike took about two hours, leaving plenty of time to get more geocaches around Honey Brook, Narvon, East Earl and New Holland before it got dark.

The last stop of the day and dinner was at Shady Maple Smorgasbord in East Earl. Shady Maple is the biggest buffet hall in the area and I'd always been intrigued by this enormous building, a Mecca of Overeating, that rises above the Amish countryside. I felt that I had to experience it at least once and since I was in the area, I went in. The place was packed! There were lines of people, like at an amusement park, just waiting to check in to the buffet. Past the cash registers, it was an old-time affair with curious dioramas and 3-D paintings. Shady Maple boasts of 200 feet of food but it's actually 100 feet of food repeated twice. The first 100 feet of buffet tables is a mirror image of the other 100 feet. I preferred the grilling stations though. I thought the crab cakes were the best but I sampled the seafood and meats from all the grilling stations. Of course, I saved some room for salad (with bacon dressing!) and dessert, which was ice cream cake! Anyway, I thought it was a worthwhile experience but maybe next time, avoid going there on a Saturday evening. I was told that the crowd isn't as bad on other nights.

Sunday's plan was fairly simple. I went geocaching up the New Jersey side of the Delaware River, through Pennsauken, Riverside, Palmyra, Willingboro, and Burlington, towards Florence, where I would end the day at the "Fall Get Together 2016" geocaching event. There was some good river scenery and a nice visit to the Palmyra Cove Nature Center along the way.

The caches... )
mortonfox: (buggy)
It was the third and last Mission GC weekend. This time, I needed to find a mystery geocache for the souvenir and the very first cache on Saturday, "A really old Smarty-Pants", fit the bill. It wasn't a very difficult mystery cache, so I'm surprised I hadn't gone for it yet. All the information you need comes from a historical marker (that you can look up online, but don't tell the cache owner! >.> ) and it's pretty much a park and grab once you have the final coordinates. So once I was done with that, everything else was gravy. There were some challenging caches and a weird one, Hungry Roach. Mr. Charles was a nice character, although his geocache took some looking to find.

Sunday's trip was to Lancaster again to find some new geocaches, both traditional and puzzle, that had been published during the week since my last visit. There was a new Pokemon-themed series, although I only did two of those. Then there was a short tour along the Susquehanna River for a bunch of caches in Washington Township and Columbia, including this turtle cache. The interesting thing about Lancaster County is the locals archive and replace sets of caches every now and then to keep things fresh. I was sure I'd finished the caches along the Enola Low-Grade Trail two years ago but there was a new set of caches, which I may return to when the weather is cool enough for a longer walk.

The caches... )
mortonfox: (buggy)
Two hot summer days this weekend. Saturday's trip was up to Warminster, Hatfield, Doylestown, and Plumsteadville. Didn't skip past the difficult caches this time because I figured the remaining easy caches were getting way too far away. It's a matter of trying your luck sometimes. "The King of Doylestown", in particular, was a micro cache with 4-star difficulty in dense woods with poor GPS reception. It took a combination of a bunch of different things to find it: I had a feeling about a certain area and I found a pen that a previous cacher probably dropped that turned out to be pretty close to the hiding spot. With some indication that I was on the right track, it was just a matter of poking around until I got it. "Prickerland II" was a different kind of challenge. The biggest hurdle was finding a way to get through a wall of overgrowth into the woods. I guess that could've waited until winter but what the hey?

Sunday's trip was in two parts. I got some local geocaches before heading over to Lancaster for the rest of the day. Once again, I didn't avoid the difficult caches. "Gardening in Pike Creek", although not an easy search, turned out to be something I'd seen before. Of course, I started from the wrong end of the row of bushes so it took a while. "Otters Cache 1" was a long walk in Wolf's Hollow County Park but the trail was mostly pretty good. The cache locations in Lancaster covered the usual assortment of quaint and historic sites, such as a covered bridge, Boehm's Chapel, and the Byerland stone meeting house.

The caches... )
mortonfox: (jaws)
Saturday's trip was to Macungie in Lehigh Valley for the "¿ I ɯɐ ʇɐɥM" cache series, which I didn't have time for the previous weekend. Each puzzle cache in this series had a riddle, which I figured out at home so I wouldn't have to do the research in the field. After that, I went for a group of caches around the Rodale Velodrome in Breinigsville.

On Sunday, I returned to the Lancaster area mainly to target the caches on the other side of Lancaster City. The "CLUE TOO" series is a murder mystery in which each cache has a clue that's a suspect, a weapon or a location. It's kind of like the "Star Trek" series that I did in February, except the clues here seem a bit more obscure. I got the more interesting caches early in the day. "147429" is a travel bug hotel inside a rental storage unit. It was the first time I'd seen one of those storage units being used as a geocache. "Night Before Christmas" is a Wherigo cache at the National Christmas Center, one of the many tourist attractions between Gap and Lancaster. The funniest cache of the day though was "A Cheap Officer". I was wondering what the title could possibly be in reference to until I saw that it was behind a Dollar General!

The caches... )
mortonfox: (fox bunny logo)
After 4 years, February 29th, the Leap Day, was once again upon us. There were special geocaching events and souvenirs for Leap Day but this time, I decided not to take the day off for that day.

Saturday's trip was to Allentown Southside in Lehigh Valley to get the Logos Wherigo geocache series. The completed series produces a piece of geo-art, in this case an outline of the Wherigo logo. Most geo-art series thus far have used mystery caches to provide a layer of indirection so that the physical caches don't actually need to be laid out like the artwork. This series, however, uses Wherigo. Whereigos are data cartridges that one can play on certain Wherigo-enabled Garmin GPS models. There are also smartphone and Pocket PC apps for Wherigo. So here, the series used 32 Wherigo cartridges, each providing the location of one of the caches once it is solved. They were all easy one-shot questions about a corporate or product logo. (Well okay, I did have to do image searches on the web for a few of those. I don't know everything! :) ) So that was the layer of indirection. Anyway, I found most of those caches quickly. A few were tricky to navigate to because I was unfamiliar with entrances to shopping centers and the one-way streets in that area. One of the caches was missing but there could have only been one place for it, so I replaced it with a preform tube from my bag of spare parts. Also the same day, I did the "Dogs Playing..." series and the "Characters" series. The latter was also a series of Wherigo caches.

Sunday's trip was to Lancaster. Two issues kept me from considering a trip to Lancaster for a couple of months: the Route 41 closure and the snow. Both of those issues were over and there were new caches, so it was a good day for that. I completed the "GP" series at Gap Park in Gap. Each of those caches was related to one bird and had information I needed to find the final bird, which was a bit away from the park. It was a somewhat challenging day though. I had to wade into the water for two of the caches. "Birds Eye View" was in a flooded area. It was just 50 feet from the parking area but the last 20 feet was into the water. No problem. I rolled up my pants and went in with sandals. The water was cold but not too cold. The problem with "Guarded Water" is the cache got stuck in a bridge crevice so one couldn't pull it up by the string on which it was hanging. So once again, I had to wade into the stream water to get close enough to get the cache unstuck with a pair of pliers. This water was a bit deeper but still not up to my knees.

Monday was when I attended 3 Leap Day geocaching events. The first one was "Ha-Ha It's Leap Day" in Talleyville. It was a lot earlier than the time I usually go to work, so I had time for two geocaches and a quesalupa breakfast afterwards. Then at lunchtime, I went to "New Castle Delaware Leap Lunch" at Mary's Kountry Kitchen in Stanton. I decided to get a second breakfast. At dinnertime, I went to "New Castle County Leap Year Event - 2016". It was great having 3 events in one day in this area.

The caches... )
mortonfox: (No hunting)
Mostly hung around my home region on this four-day weekend because unlike last year, I didn't see a reason to travel out. One thing this allowed me to do was snag a few choice deals on Black Friday, although for the sake of sanity, I did avoid the shopping areas late Thursday evening and Friday morning. It seems to be the one time of the year the mall parking lot is packed all the way to the edges!

Thursday's and Friday's trips were a return to South Jersey, around Greenwich, Woodbury, Mantua, Sicklerville, Erial, Haddonfield, and Berlin. The Riverfront Trail was very quiet Thanksgiving morning. There was a dragonfly geocache and an alligator geocache, and Haddonfield had some cute tile art.

Saturday's trip was to Lancaster. Route 41 was still closed for bridge repair but this time, the detour route had new geocaches. One interesting thing is of the day's cache list, 6 caches had titles in Ukrainian and 1 cache was Chinese. The area has gone mutlicultural! :) The only issue was my automotive GPS couldn't render those characters, but I could still search for those by GC code.

Sunday's trip was mostly close to home, around Chester County and parts of northwest Philadelphia. Best view of the day was from the top of a cliff down to a lake in East Whiteland, at "Acapulco, No Diving". I also wondered why the Willistown seal, which I saw at a park entrance, had a fox head, but an old news article has the answer.

The caches... )
mortonfox: (buggy)
Saturday's trip was northwest to Morgantown and Reading since I'd solved some puzzle caches up that way and wanted to log the physical caches. One nice thing about heading out that way on Saturday was the libraries were open for at least part of the day and I was able to get two library geocaches. Both of them, "What the Dewey" and "Bear Tales The Sequel", were set up similarly, with a Dewey call number outside the library and a hollowed-out book placed on a shelf in the library, among the other books. Other noteworthy items seen on Saturday were the Bondsville Mill ruins and an eyeball. (really a nicely-painted Halloween pumpkin)

Sunday's trip was to Lancaster County. One major problem there was the Route 41 closure. This road closure forced such a long detour that I don't think it's a good idea to take any more trips that way until the bridge reconstruction is completed. Anyway, this trip focused on Southern Lancaster County, mostly around Strasburg, Willow Grove, Quarryville, and Fulton. Among the various sites I visited was Robert Fulton's birthplace. He was an 18th century inventor and engineer who developed a commercial steamboat. I am still wondering about the soap on a rope in the tree though. Several of those were in Lancaster County Central Park and may or may not have something to do with the memorial under that tree.

The caches... )
mortonfox: (buggy)
The main goal on Saturday was to find a mystery cache to get the Put On Your Thinking Cap souvenir. The very first cache of the day, "Forgotten Bridge, Forgotten Code", which I'd been saving for a few weeks for this, came in handy for that. It's a simple puzzle about reading a piece of punched tape. Since that was the last of the five souvenirs, I got the Road Trip Hero souvenir for completing the "journey". To my surprise though, I also got the International Geocaching Day 2015 souvenir! I'd forgotten that August 15 was the day. So from one cache, I got 3 souvenirs. Not too shabby!

So what to do for the rest of the day? Why, take a trip to Lancaster, of course! I've seen lots of Amish buggies before but it was the first time I had to search one of those for a cache. "horse power" was that cache. It actually wasn't too difficult, although there sure were lots of crevices and corners where a microcache could have been hidden. There were also some creative caches, like this small wooden well. The main part of the afternoon was going around Ephrata for the "Sticky Situation" series. Each cache was something sticky like a bottle of honey, buttered popcorn, or a candy apple. Of course, the food items were plastic replicas since one cannot leave the actual items out there.

Sunday's trip was a sampling of new geocaches in the part of Bucks County past northeast Philadelphia. Actually, we were way past that area, according to this 19th century mile marker. It was, however, The Prettiest Spot In Bucks County. (Cuttalossa Farm) Actually, my intended destination was Newtown but only got there after exploring Warminster, Wrightstown, Anchor, Buckingham, New Hope, and Upper/Lower Makefield. It was a pretty full day with 40 geocaches over a wide area.

The caches... )
mortonfox: (buggy)
Yippee! Another trip to Lancaster County. It was a day of scenery, gardens, frog, and ruins. Actually, the garden area, next to Donegal Presbyterian Church, had interesting history because that's the location of the Witness Tree, where Reverend McFarquhar and congregation vowed to join forces against the British in September of 1777, upon hearing news that the British army had left New York to invade Pennsylvania. Anyway, the Pastor Tom saw that I was getting information from the plaques and offered a short tour of the church. There are some unusual things about this church. The pews were made from window shutters donated by the community, an 18th-century example of recycling and also they couldn't get enough wood back then. Also, the bones of a horse are buried under the church. They found those while doing renovation work about 25 years ago.

On Sunday, I returned to the same area around Elizabethtown in Lancaster County for some geocaches in the Elizabethtown College area. It's kind of neat that they formed a geocaching club at this college. After that, I continued to Middletown and Swatara. I went for some geocaches along the Swatara Creek Trail before giving up because the area was rather overgrown with vegetation. So I pushed onwards into Hummelstown and Hershey. (I didn't really go to Clown Park but I thought the sign was funny.)

The caches... )
mortonfox: (face tree)
On Saturday, I headed up towards Hanover again via I-83 from Baltimore. There were still a bunch of geocaches to do before getting to Hanover. Those were mostly in Codorus State Park, itself a notable destination judging by the crowd and the two wedding receptions that day. (While looking for a geocache near a parking area, I overheard someone giving directions: "Go down the road. You'll see a Wedding sign but that's not ours...") After that, the next stop was Hanover town. Finally! It was everything I expected. The HGT series of caches is the Hanover Geo Trail. It's placed in a style similar to the Spring Grove GeoTour and highlights historic and other notable sites around Hanover. I got most of those caches in a day, although there are still enough for another trip out to southwest York County.

On Sunday, before continuing on to York County, I hit some downtown Lancaster geocache sites. There were a bunch of caches near some interesting public art sculptures: the lion fountain (the cache was actually hidden in his... uhh... no-no spot. :) ), bronze kids and dog sculpture, and Silent Symphony. (kinetic sculpture that spins in the wind) After a few more caches around the Lancaster suburbs, I continued onwards to York County. I got up to York Haven when the right rear brake locked up and the wheel wouldn't move. Fortunately, the car was on a quiet street when that happened. So I left it there and took a walk around York Haven for a few geocaches before calling AAA for a tow back home. The tow truck driver suggested that simply disconnecting the brake line may release the brake.

The caches... )
mortonfox: (hump)
Saturday's trip started with a few geocaches near Strasburg and Ronks. Then I went to West York. I actually didn't think York was that great, especially when I got closer to the downtown area. So I decided to head out to the countryside. Spring Grove was more to my liking. There was a big collection of geocaches, all placed for the Spring Grove Geotour, and most of those were rather creative. The most remarkable one was the motorized geocache. I only needed to bring an AA battery to use the gadget to retrieve the cache and log. There was also a dinosaur head geocache (yes, just the head), a multi-room travel bug hotel, and a funny geocache warning sign.

Went to the York area again on Sunday. I decided not to skip ahead to areas beyond Spring Grove, so I went northwest from York to Shiloh, Weigelstown, Dover, and Wellsville. It was a mixed day with some hiking and some difficult geocaches but nothing remarkable.

The caches... )
mortonfox: (buggy)
For Saturday, I noticed a collection of new geocaches around Mullica Hill and Glassboro, so that's where I started. And the rest of the day was a trip around Turnersville, Williamstown, Waterford Works, Atco, and Berlin. I didn't intend for this to be a Weird NJ tour but that's how it went. There were a living room furniture set in the woods, a giant lumberjack (Mr. Bills Restaurant in Winslow), and the abandoned Atco drive-in.

Sunday was another trip to York after finding an Easter geocache in Lancaster. This time, I was on the north side of York, including Emigsville, Mount Wolf, Manchester, and part of West York. Easter was the perfect time for geocaching in York because nearly all the stores were closed for the holiday, so traffic wasn't so bad. On the other hand, it was a terrible time for getting dinner after geocaching because nearly all the restaurants were closed. So thank goodness there was a Chinese restaurant near the last geocache.

The caches... )
mortonfox: (buggy)
This weekend was a breakout event after a snowbound winter. Other than a few patches of stubborn ice on the ground, all the signs of winter were gone and geocaches were once again revealed to the world. Saturday's excursion began with "LVGC Breakfast in the Valley 2015", a breakfast geocaching event at Borderline Restaurant in Bethlehem. After an eggs benedict and some conversation, I headed out eastwards into Bethlehem, Easton, Palmer, Forks. There was the "WPBP" series on the Wilson-Palmer Bike Path, which I started last year but didn't have time to finish. Well, I got nearly all of it on Saturday! Also, there were lots of geocaches placed in that area within the last six months, including the "Farmers view" series and the "Holiday Shopping" series. And I also got the "Challenge Park" trio, which I thought were all pretty easy challenges, except probably to new folks who haven't found enough caches to fill the requirements.

On Sunday, I started with some geocaches in Mountville and Columbia, to the west of Lancaster City, and then decided to expand my territory into York County. I'd actually been there a few years ago but thought that it was too far for a day trip. It actually isn't, compared to Lehigh Valley, except that the roads aren't as good so it feels like a longer trip. Since I hadn't been there in a while, there was a variety of geocaches, although mostly clustered around some shopping centers and a few major parks in East York, Springettsbury, and Spry. My overall impression of York is it isn't as interesting (in terms of culture, scenery, and variety of geocaches) as Lancaster but I haven't seen the other half of York, which may change my opinion. I loved that they got permission for those geocaches. I stopped at a fruit/vegetable market in Hallam to look for a geocache and the friendly store owner, who already knew about it, came out to say hello even though the store was actually closed on Sunday.

The caches... )
mortonfox: (morton blvd)
Saturday was a busy day. It was Pi Day (3/14/15), so there were lots of geocaching events taking place. I picked three that didn't conflict and were all within 30 miles from home. So at breakfast time, I went to "A Breakfast Pi? S.T.R.A.N.G.E.!" at Wegman's in Downingtown. Then at lunchtime, I went to "Almost St. Patty's Day" at Charcoal Pit in Wilmington. Then at dinnertime, I went to "2015 NJ PI Event 3.1415" at East Garden Buffet in Sicklerville. Of course, there were other geocaches and some event bonus caches along the way. So all in all, it was quite a day. The funniest part was a group of geocachers from Chester County picked the same events that I did. So I kept seeing them every couple of hours!

Sunday was a comparatively laid-back trip to Lancaster County. I hit Lancaster and then worked my way north/northeast to Lititz, West Earl, Ephrata, Reamstown, and Denver. I love the humorous and creative caches that folks in this area place. "Spiders and Rats and Zombies, Oh My!" actually had a spider, a rat, and a zombie hand. Then, there was the toilet geocache. The story is that's the site of a hotel that was torn down but they left toilets all over the place. Later in the afternoon, I went for the "Sticky Situation" series in Ephrata, which had a bunch of neat fake food props. Among those were a spilled ice cream geocache and a donut geocache. I love these because it's obvious they're having fun with humorous and themed geocaches.

The caches... )
mortonfox: (buggy)
On Saturday, I headed out to Lancaster for the Pirates geocache series. This is another themed series where you have to find a set of caches to get information for the final cache. One of the caches had a problem but I didn't really need its part of the final coordinates since I could infer the latitude degrees from the general area. So I found the treasure chest! Of course, I also got some geocaches in Upper Leacock and Ephrata along the way since I didn't cover that area on my previous trips this year. This being Lancaster County, there was ample opportunity to view cows and covered bridges.

Sunday was a trip to Montgomery County to do some recent geocaches. I also retried some caches with which I had trouble during the summer because of thick vegetation. "Binary Bytes" was an example of that. Although it is a puzzle cache, the cache hide is tougher than the puzzle. The bush still had plenty of leaves but in early autumn, it had thinned out just enough for me to see the cache. "Everyone's Favorite Breakfast Pastry" was another one that was tough in the summer, not so much for vegetation but for ticks, as other geocachers have noted in their online logs. But I think a few nights with frost have brought them down to a minimum. I had no trouble anyway.

The caches... )
mortonfox: (buggy)
Took the day off from work on Thursday because it was my birthday. After getting my free Grand Slam at Denny's, I headed over to Lancaster County. I thought it would be nice for a change of pace to take a stab at some geocaches that incorporate tours of the area. "E-Town Mural Trail - History in Pictures" was the perfect example. It was a visit to some murals and historic sites around Elizabethtown, followed by the final geocache at the town library. It's a fake book, which of course was placed in the non-circulating reference books section at the library. The tour was actually to gather information for both the final coordinates and the Dewey decimal number of the book. I got some of the digits wrong but was still able to figure it out. All in all, it was an entertaining experience. I also completed "Rudolf goes down in History....The Reindeer Series", a cache series I'd been working on and off for four years! Again, I didn't have all the information but was able to figure it out. The final cache for this was a bit of an adventure, with an old railroad bridge with gaps in the planks and an overgrown railbed to deal with. The cache description says "The rest of the way is a piece of cake" but that was written four years ago before the bushes grew up.

On Saturday, I returned to the Elizabethtown area. This time, I went for the series of caches along the Conewago Trail and the Lebanon Valley Rail Trail, which are connected. Most of the "Trail Watcher" caches along this trail are animals, such as the rabbit, dragon, and lizard. However, there were also a bowling ball (not part of the same series but still unusual) and an antique GPS. I also finally was able to find the caches I'd driven by so many times because those were close to the Pennsylvania Turnpike. The rail trail, in fact, goes under the turnpike.

Sunday was another trip to the Elizabethtown area, to the Northwest Lancaster County River Trail in Conoy. I tackled the "LOST on the NW" series of caches, which were all along the river trail. It was 3 miles of hiking out to the end of the trail, where it looked like there was construction to continue building the trail under the railroad bridge, and 3 miles back. Most of those were quite easy, except "LOST on the NW: I am King of the World". A big tree had fallen over that one, so I had to climb around the top and bottom of the rock wall and through some bushes from a few different directions in the course of searching for it. Dinner was a visit to Hoss's in Elizabethtown. It's one of those places where one can have ice cream and French onion soup at the same time and dress up fruit with peanut butter fudge because all those items are at the salad bar!

The caches... )
mortonfox: (buggy)
Saturday morning was the LVGC Breakfast geocaching event at Borderline in Bethlehem. This was a pretty last-minute plan since I didn't notice the event in the list until just two days prior. It was a rainy day, so I opted not to hike one of the Lehigh Valley rail trails afterwards. There were still many geocaches around Bethlehem, Hellertown, and Springtown that were one-offs and not too far from parking, so I could hurry back if the rain picked up. The only disappointment in this area is some geocaches were never maintained, even after getting ruined over the winter. I replaced one of the caches since it had been confirmed missing by others and I knew the hiding style.

Sunday was another trip to Lancaster, this time covering the areas north of US-30 in Manheim, Lititz, and Warwick. Mostly, those were geocaches placed for previous monthly events (which I did not attend because those were on weekdays) and a new World War II puzzle series. In contrast to Saturday, the weather was great for walking around and I continued seeking a set of geocaches along a rail trail in Manheim that I started months ago. Also came across a curious structure, a fort-like stone wall that surrounds a drain near a park and library that aren't actually that old. But this is Lancaster, so if a castle can be a prison (see last weekend's entry), then a fort can be a drain. :)

The caches... )
mortonfox: (morton blvd)
On Saturday, I went to Lancaster to attend the "38 Mack Fire Engine" flash mob geocaching event. Yes, we actually had a 1938 Mack firetruck to gather around. As with almost every Lancaster County trip, this one was interesting for the variety of caches. For "1.6 Away", I waded across a creek to the island where the cache was. The water temperature was perfect that morning and it was fun to dip into. Plus, the view of the dam under the bridge upstream was picturesque. "Thar She Blows!" was another interesting one. To retrieve the cache, one has to blow on one end of a U-shaped pipe to make it pop out the other end. "Eyes are on you" brought me to a creepy mural on the side of a bowling alley.

For Sunday, I decided to continue my cache marathon up the Jersey Shore in order to finish most of it before beach season begins. I got up to Avalon on my previous trip, so this time, I did Sea Isle City and Ocean City. This is one stretch that is chock-full of caches. Nearly every block in Ocean City had one. There were some interesting things to see too, like the pirate ("end of the road"), the stone turtle ("SEE THE ISLE"), and the sandal tree. ("Christmas tree...Ocean City style")

One thing I had no idea about was that the Doo Dah Parade was this weekend. Most of the beach areas looked rather quiet and there was no indication that anything major was going on. I have no interest in attending Doo Dah, but had I known it was this weekend, I would've stopped by the central boardwalk area on my way up Ocean City to see if any of my friends were hanging out. Oh well. Maybe next time.

The caches... )
mortonfox: (morton blvd)
This weekend, it rained continuously for two days. I avoided taking any long hikes because I'd have to carry an umbrella around the whole time. Still, there were plenty of geocaches that weren't far from parking areas and roadsides. On Saturday, I went geocaching in the Montgomery/Bucks area in the towns of Ambler, Lower Gwynedd, Horsham, and Chalfont. As is usual for that area, most of the caches were by Taxman. Two of those, "This Is Goodbye" and "My Farewell Cache", were "goodbye" caches, in which he announced his retirement from placing caches. I think it's a running gag because he was still putting those out as of a few days ago.

On Sunday, I was planning to attend a geocaching event in Collegeville but by the end of the day, I changed my mind because I was wet and muddy, and perhaps a bit too messy for Wegmans. Anyway, I went to Ephrata for the "Well Trained Monkey" series. These caches were mostly puzzles but I knew the solutions all led to easy park & grab cache sites. This cache series was a bit spread out, so I went from Ephrata to Denver, Adamstown, Sinking Spring, Spring Ridge, and Bern, up by Reading. While in those areas, I got whatever other caches that I figured were easy to get to in the rain, and some that weren't so easy. After finishing the monkey series, I hung around Wyomissing and Kenhorst and actually finished a bunch of other geocaches that I couldn't find on previous trips. These caches were the kind that were hidden by vegetation, which fortunately was still sparse after the long winter. In particular, "Three Little Pigs: Straw" was really obvious now that the bush is bare!

The caches... )

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Morton Fox

September 2017

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